Tomato Asparagus Panzanella Salad

   

It’s been over a month since my last post, which means I have all kinds of things I can talk about this time around. A little while back Jah presented me with 3 seats to a local cheese-making class with The Dallas Mozzarella Co.  Jah and I brought my friend Leanna and we had a great time making fresh ricotta, mozzarella, oaxaca, and a fresh olive stuffed mozzarella roll. Of course with all of that unbelievably fresh cheese in my fridge, how could I resist making something like this beautiful tomato asparagus panzanella salad?

 Before I delve too much into the details of salad making (not that this salad has many – it’s so simple), I thought I’d talk a little about springtime in Texas. The telltale sign of spring is when the bluebonnets carpet the landscape. Not wanting to miss one of the prime spots for this surreal display of color, I drove out to Ennis, TX with my friend Chris to be able to photograph the fields at sunrise. Needless to say it was a worthwhile adventure!

Ennis Bluebonnets

After enjoying the brisk air (ok I was freezing ) we hopped back in the car and roamed the country side looking for more lovely photo ops. Along the way we stopped and snacked on the moist double chocolate zucchini muffins I packed for the trip (a recipe I’ll definitely have to share later). We saw deer, rabbits, horses, longhorn cattle, and even a grumpy minidonk! After a brief detour into a local winery we found a gorgeous field blanketed with bright red Indian paintbrush and had to get a shot.

Ennis Indian Paintbrush

Texas has a bit of a reputation for being a large expanse of dessert… essentially the prototype for every old western ever made. Believe it or not there is green stuff here too! 

But enough about all of that. You’re here for juicy, ripe tomatoes, aren’t cha? Me too, man… me too.

Tomato Asparagus Panzanella Salad

Panzanella is an Italian salad made with bits of bread, often as a means to use that day old loaf you’ve got sitting around. With such simple ingredients quality is really going to make a difference, so make sure to get the best tomatoes you can find. I love to mix varieties for a more colorful presentation, plus it adds a little complexity to the overall flavor. I make this style of salad fairly often whenever I’m preparing food for a large group of people, because it is so easy to multiply out to serve more. 

Tomato Asparagus Panzanella Salad

Tomato Asparagus Panzanella Salad
Serves 6
A simple Itaian salad tossed with cubes of toasted day old bread.
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
10 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 small Italian baguette, cut into 1 inch cubes
  2. 1 1/2 pounds of mixed tomatoes, chopped (or about 2 pints of cherry tomatoes, halved)
  3. 1 bundle fresh asparagus, tough ends removed and cut into bite sized pieces
  4. 6-8 ounces fresh mozzarella, cut into small cubes
  5. 1/2 cup fresh basil, chopped
  6. 3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  7. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Toss bread cubes with about a tablespoon of olive oil and sprinkle with a little bit of sea salt. Bake at 425 for about 8 minutes until nice and toasty. Keep an eye on them as oven temps may vary. I give them a shake in the pan about halfway through.
  2. Combine olive oil, tomatoes, asparagus, fresh basil, and mozzarella in a large bowl and toss well to coat. Season liberally with salt and pepper.
  3. A few minutes prior to serving combine the tomato mixture with the toasted bread crumbs.
Calories
  1. Calorie count for this dish will vary a bit since the measurements are thrown together rather loosely. I find it often falls between 320-370 per serving whenever I make it.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/
Tomato Asparagus Panzanella Salad


Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette

   

I’ve wanted to make something like this for a while, and whenever I saw the pile of vibrant heirloom tomatoes at the grocery store I knew the time had come. The beautiful variegation is simple to do, but any color of tomato will taste amazing. Only good things happen when you combine fresh tomato, basil, and burrata cheese.

Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette

The first time I made this we basically stood over the counter eating it slice by slice until it was gone, accidentally spoiling our dinner. I wasn’t super happy about the photos I took the first time around, so I made this recipe again the following night. We told ourselves that we couldn’t inhale the entire loaf like we did before. Our intentions were good, but so is this bread. The baguette won us over and we ate the whole loaf again. Fans of bruschetta will undoubtedly love it as much as we did. Or just fans of tomato.

Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette

If you’re unfamiliar with burrata, it’s basically a pouch of soft stretched mozzarella stuffed with even softer mozzarella and fresh cream. Its flavor is subtle, milky, and awesome. If you can’t find burrata you could always use buffalo mozzarella or even something like ricotta if you prefer to have a spreadable consistency.

Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette

Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette
Serves 8
A beautiful appetizer made with colorful heirloom tomatoes, burrata, and fresh basil.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 loaf french bread, cut in half length-wise
  2. 8oz burrata cheese
  3. 4 heirloom tomatoes, sliced
  4. 4 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
  5. 2 tablespoons olive oil
  6. Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425F.
  2. Brush the tops of each half of the french bread with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Place in oven for about 5 minutes until lightly toasted. If you prefer your bread more toasty just leave it in a little longer.
  3. Spread burrata over each half of the toasted bread. I use my fingers to break up the outer pouch of stretched mozzarella into little pieces. Drizzle with remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil, sprinkle lightly with a little salt and fresh black pepper.
  4. Scatter chopped basil over the top of the cheese and then arrange sliced tomatoes on top of that. I used four tomatoes (I got about 4 slices out of each, two for each half) in a purple eggplant color, deep red, orange, and yellow. You could also alternate two colors or just use one color across the whole thing.
  5. Season with a little extra salt and pepper, slice, and enjoy!
Calories
  1. 243
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/
Heirloom Tomato Burrata Baguette


Dad’s Cornbread Dressing

   

Sometimes I find it hard to believe that I didn’t like dressing as a kid. I’m not sure why it took me so long to evolve into a rational human being with properly functioning taste buds, but fortunately I wasn’t crazy forever and now I’m an honest to goodness dressing fiend. Like most families, our Thanksgiving table is steeped in familiarity and tradition. The spread rarely changes – roasted turkey, mashed potatoes with gravy, cranberry sauce, macaroni and cheese, token green veggie casserole of some sort, dinner rolls, and of course good ol’ cornbread dressing. Dressing – or stuffing if that’s what you prefer to call it – seems to be a very personal thing and the idea of what makes it good varies from family to family. But if someone were to ask me about the dressing I crave (I’m going to pretend you just did), then I would tell them it would definitely be this adaptation of the recipe my dad makes every year.

 

Dad's Cornbread Dressing

My changes from the original are probably a little bit obvious if you are aware of the fact I ate meat until I was 18 – so naturally the main adjustment was making it vegetarian friendly. Dad also prepares his with chopped up hard-boiled eggs, something that’s never been my cup of tea but a lot of people really enjoy eggs in their dressing. If you’re a vegan and looking to adapt this to your lifestyle, substitute the butter with olive oil or margarine and omit the parmesan cheese. Adding a couple of tablespoons of nutritional yeast would be awesome in its place. You’ll also want to make sure that the breakfast sausage you use is vegan friendly. On the other hand, if you’re a meat-eater you can use regular sausage – but make sure it is cooked before adding it to the recipe.

cornbreadstuffing2

One of the great things about recipes like these is that they are so easy to change to suit your personal tastes. Someone that likes a more dry and crumbly dressing (no doubt for its optimal gravy absorption qualities) can use less stock, whereas the people that want their dressing thick enough to slice can use more. I would say that anywhere from 1 1/2 to 3 cups is the range you want to stay in. The force with which you pack it into the casserole dish before baking will also have an effect on the end texture. Personally I like a bit of balance between the two extremes and I’ve written up the recipe to reflect that preference. You can substitute other nuts for the pecans, toss some sauteed button mushrooms into the mix, use a different combination of fresh herbs, bake individual servings in muffin tins, or whatever else tickles your fancy. Hell, try using jalapeno cornbread and chorizo for a southwestern twist. Once you’re acquainted with the basic ingredients, it’s pretty simple to take this recipe and make it your own. Ahh, the beauty of cooking…

Dad's Cornbread Dressing

Dad's Cornbread Dressing
Serves 12
A vegetarian friendly cornbread dressing with fresh herbs, sausage, and pecans.
Print
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
45 min
Total Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 8″ skillet (or 8×8″ pan) of cornbread
  2. 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  3. 1/2 yellow onion, diced
  4. 2 stalks celery, diced
  5. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  6. 1 tablespoon fresh sage, minced (this was about 12 medium sized sage leaves for me)
  7. 1 sprig fresh rosemary
  8. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  9. 1 teaspoon black pepper
  10. 4 vegetarian breakfast sausage patties, cooked and chopped (this ends up being about 1 cup of sausage)
  11. 1 cup pecans, coarsely chopped
  12. 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  13. 1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
  14. 2 cups prepared stock (give or take depending on how crumbly or moist your prefer your dressing to be)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375F. Butter your casserole dish (I used an 8″x11″ oval dish) and set aside.
  2. In a nonstick skillet heat butter, sage, and rosemary on medium heat until the butter just starts to bubble.
  3. Add onion, celery, garlic, salt, and pepper then cook for another 3-4 minutes. Remove rosemary sprig and transfer the contents of the skillet to a large mixing bowl.
  4. Wipe the skillet clean and toss in your chopped pecans. Toast over medium heat until fragrant and then add them to the mixing bowl.
  5. Crumble the cornbread into the bowl with the sausage, parsley, and cheese. Toss everything until well combined. Taste and add a little more salt if needed (I find the individual ingredients usually have enough sodium on their own that it doesn’t need it).
  6. Transfer the cornbread mixture to your prepared baking dish and lightly pack it down. Pour stock evenly over the top.
  7. Place dish in the oven and bake for 40 minutes. If you prefer the top to be a little more crisp, pop it under the broiler for a minute or two.
Calories
  1. 255
Notes
  1. You can easily get this recipe under 200 calories by using half of the pecans and cutting the butter back to 1 tablespoon. Add a touch more stock to compensate for the reduced amount of butter.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/
 

Dad's Cornbread Dressing


Pumpkin Scones w/ Brown Butter Glaze

   

Earlier this week I decided that I wanted to make pumpkin pancakes as my next blog post, but between then and now I noticed the food blogger scene absolutely exploding with pumpkin pancake recipes. While I’m sure I could have made some great pancakes with a unique twist on them, I decided to go a different route and making pumpkin spice scones instead. I’ve never actually made scones before but I have made plenty of biscuits so I figured I could tackle the job. We loved how they turned out – a nice slightly crumbly texture but not too dry, full of warm autumnal spices and not too sweet. That is until you pour the liquid crack over them. Ok, so the scones are good, but the browned butter glaze? I need to find a scientist to manifest this stuff into human form so I can make out with it in the back seat of a car. I am not ashamed of these thoughts.

Pumpkin Scone w/ Brown Butter Glaze

 Just as I talked about in my buttermilk biscuit recipe, it’s important to use cold ingredients when making scones. Handle the dough as little as possible or you run the risk of biting into tough, chewy scone as opposed to a soft, crumbly one. For the glaze (oh man, that glaze) you have a couple of options for how you can use it. One way is to put it into a piping bag and pipe stripes across each cooled scone for sort of a toaster strudel effect. The other option is to warm the glaze slightly and spoon it over the top, allowing it to drip down the sides. They are equally delicious but the latter is more conducive to eating the scones warm (which is how I preferred them). The glaze recipe actually makes enough to frost closer to 10 pastries, but the scone recipe itself only makes 8. Oh well, I guess you’ll just have to eat the rest with a spoon… dreadful I know…

Pumpkin Scone w/ Brown Butter Glaze

I find these to be just a little more moist and slightly cake-like than your traditional scone, but I think it’s wonderful that way. You could probably increase the cooking time just a tad to dry it out some more if that is your preference. Oh and if you don’t have all of the individual spices needed to follow the recipe exactly, you could always use a tablespoon or so of pumpkin pie spice instead. Get ready for your kitchen to smell amazing either way!

Pumpkin Scone w/ Brown Butter Glaze

Pumpkin Spice Scones
Serves 8
Warm, autumnal pumpkin scones come together in minutes.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup all purpose flour
  2. 1 cup whole wheat flour
  3. 1 tablespoon baking powder
  4. 1/2 teaspoon salt
  5. 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  6. 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  7. 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  8. 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
  9. 1/2 cup or 1 stick unsalted COLD butter, cubed
  10. 1/2 15-ounce can pumpkin (not pie filling)
  11. 1/3 cup light brown sugar
  12. 1/4 cup heavy whipping cream
  13. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  14. 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  15. 1 tablespoon orange juice
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425F and line baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.
  2. In basin of food processor combine flours, baking powder, salt, and spices with cubed butter. Pulse until mixture resembles a coarse meal.
  3. In a small bowl whisk together pumpkin, sugar, cream, vanilla extract, orange zest, and orange juice. Add to dry ingredients and pulse until just combined. Do not overmix.
  4. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gently press into a circle about an inch thick. Slice circle into 8ths.
  5. Transfer wedges to prepared baking sheet and bake for 14-16 minutes or until the edges or just barely turning golden.
  6. Remove from oven and transfer to cooling rack. If piping stripes onto your scones, allow them to cool completely before frosting.
Calories
  1. 271
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/
Brown Butter Glaze
Serves 10
Rich, sweet and thoroughly addicting brown butter glaze is lick-the-bowl good.
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
5 min
Total Time
10 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup or 1/2 stick unsalted butter
  2. 1 cup powdered sugar
  3. 1 ounce (about 2 tablespoons) cream cheese (I used reduced fat)
  4. 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  5. 2-4 tablespoons milk (I used almond milk)
Instructions
  1. Using a light bottomed pan (a dark nonstick surface makes it hard to see the color of your butter change) melt unsalted butter.
  2. The butter will begin to foam and eventually subside. Whisk regularly until the butter turns a rich amber color and releases a nutty aroma.
  3. In a medium bowl combine browned butter and remaining ingredients. Beat until smooth and creamy.
  4. Add the milk 1 tablespoon at a time to achieve your desired consistency.
Calories
  1. 97
Notes
  1. If you use all of the icing between the 8 scones (I wouldn’t blame you!) then the calories per serving changes to 121.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/

Pumpkin Scone w/ Brown Butter Glaze


Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

   

Biscuits with gravy. Sausage biscuit sandwiches. Biscuits with butter and jam. Biscuits with more biscuits. Maybe it’s typical of me to say because I’m from the south but… BISCUITS. ARE. SO. AWESOME. And apparently the word makes less and less sense the more I type it out. Biscuits. Bis-cuits? Weird.

Even though a breakfast of biscuits and gravy is really traditional down here (and one of my favorite things to eat) it’s something that has made its way around to other parts of the states. Even if you’ve never had yours with a savory milk gravy, you’ve likely had some sausage patties or fried chicken sandwiched within a soft buttery biscuit. If you’re not from the U.S. you might be more familiar with scones, which are very similar but not quite the same. They are prepared in much the same way but scones are usually a bit sweeter and are often full of mix-ins like fruit and nuts. Also I’ve noticed they are more likely to be cut into cute little triangles whereas a traditional buttermilk biscuit is almost always round.

OK – enough of that. Let’s get some food porn up in here.

 Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

Mmmm…

Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

 Over time I’ve learned a few things about making good biscuits. If you’ve ever made them before, or had experience with other flaky baked goods such as pie crust, then you probably know that using COLD butter is key to getting the texture right. Cold out of the fridge, cold while you’re mixing, and cold when it goes in the oven. For this reason that also means you need to handle your dough as lightly and quickly and possible. Not only will the temperature of your butter lower as you touch it, over mixing will cause the gluten in your flour to go nuts and you will end up with a dense, chewy product in the end. Unfortunately for me I have uncommonly warm hands which is why I opt to use the food processor when making biscuits. It has the added bonus of being super quick. Whenever I feel like my hands are especially hot I will run them until cool water and dry them off before handling the dough. Another tip I use for making sure my dough is super chilled is that I put the butter and flour into the freezer while I preheat my oven. If you’re reading this a feeling a little bit intimidated (“OMG WHAT IF I AM NOT FAST ENOUGH??”) – don’t be! If I can make tender, fluffy biscuits with my fists of lava anyone can.

 

Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits

Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits
Serves 6
Traditional southern style biscuits – fluffy, buttery, and delicious!
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 tablespoons COLD unsalted butter
  2. 2 1/4 cups cake flour
  3. 1 tablespoon baking powder
  4. 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  5. 1/2-1 teaspoon salt (1/2 teaspoon is good if you’re serving with gravy, 1 teaspoon lets the biscuits stand on their own a little better)
  6. 1 cup buttermilk
Instructions
  1. In a food processor pulse together everything but the buttermilk until a bit crumbly. You want small pieces of butter to stay in tact. Transfer to the freezer.
  2. Preheat oven to 500F and butter a round baking pan.
  3. When the oven is hot put your flour mixture back on the food processor. Pour in the buttermilk and pulse until just combined. Absolutely do not overmix! The dough will be loose and shaggy – that’s ok.
  4. Pour the dough out onto a floured surface and with a light touch press it into a rough rectangle shape. Fold it over itself twice and then press it out again so it’s about an inch thick.
  5. Using a biscuit cutter begin to cut out your biscuits. Depending on how much you pressed out your dough, you will get 5 or 6 big biscuits with a 3″ cutter. You could press your dough out a little bit more, use a 2″ inch cutter, and probably manage to squeeze out 10-12 biscuits if you prefer that. Alternatively you could use the method of cutting out the biscuits with the rim of a drinking glass. This is a common thing to do but the dull edge of the glass can crimp and seal the sides of the biscuit, causing it not to rise quite as well. It will still work though and I did this for years.
  6. Put the buttered pan in the oven until the butter gets hot (not too long or it will smoke). Remove it and place your cut biscuits inside. The edges will probably touch and that’s ok. It’s also ok if they don’t.
  7. Pop the pan in the oven for 12-14 minutes or until golden brown on top. Eat them warm from the oven and realize how great your life is right now.
Calories
  1. 270
Notes
  1. Cake flour is used because of its lower gluten content. You could also get an extra light biscuit flour (easier to find in the south, and more expensive than the other flours) to go the extra mile. If you only have all purpose flour on hand, you can reduce the amount to 2 cups and whisk in 2 tablespoons of corn starch.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/

Fluffy Buttermilk Biscuits


Hummingbird French Toast

   

Today I’m going to tell you a little story about a mild baking failure that was reborn as a heavenly breakfast dish the following day. Like a diabetic phoenix rising from powdered sugar ashes.

I’ve been working on refining a recipe for a hummingbird cake in bread form. The first loaf I made came out a little too dense and dry for my tastes so after some modifications the second loaf went into the oven. When it finished and cooled, I sliced off the end piece and knew I was on the right track because this time the bread was fluffy, moist, and delicious. Excitedly I started slicing off more pieces to plate for photographing, but as I made my way to the center I learned that the loaf was undercooked. The middle was far too wet as the bread really needed at least another 15-20 minutes in the oven. While I could have transferred it back to the oven to try and bake it through some more, I really wanted to be able to write up an exact cooking time when posting it to my blog. The only option for getting it right was to start the recipe from scratch again and to try and perfect the cooking time. Third time’s a charm, right? We will see when I make it again in a couple of days!

Now I am left with this poor, flawed loaf that never got to mature into its hummingbird adulthood. Don’t worry little guy, I won’t give up on you! I will wave my magic spatula and turn you into the best darned french toast ever.

 

I knew that my friend Chris (someone with more enthusiasm for eggs than is normal for any human being) would be over for breakfast. Considering I was going to be making French toast for him, a French toast without any eggs, I had my work cut out for me. Then of course there is Jah, who has never eaten French toast because he has never eaten eggs. I also wanted to make his first experience as enjoyable as possible. There would be judgement happening here, yo.

Seeing as the bread was already sweet and a little under-baked, I opted to do two things with the batter. The first was that I wanted to make it slightly savory with the addition of neufchâtel cheese (inspired by the use of cream cheese frosting on hummingbird cake). Second was that I wanted to brush on the batter rather than dipping the slices, so it wouldn’t be a soggy mess. Just enough to crisp up those edges. While this would have been delicious with a pat of butter and a drizzle of maple syrup I really wanted to play off the ingredients in the bread a little further. I whipped together a sweet caramel rum sauce with bananas, pecans, and cinnamon that was spooned over the top with a dusting of powdered sugar.

The verdict? Both of the guys loved it! As a matter of fact Chris said that I have ruined French toast for him forever because this version was way too delicious. If that’s not an indicator of the tastiness of the recipe then I don’t know what is. So if you find yourself stuck with a loaf of undercooked sweet bread, don’t lose heart. You can always turn that sucker around into something awesome. That said, you certainly don’t need a fail-loaf to make this tasty dish. Whatever bread you have lying around would work beautifully.

Hummingbird French Toast w/ Banana Pecan Topping
Serves 6
A decadent and sweet treat that’s simple to whip together and requires no eggs.
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
25 min
Ingredients
  1. 5 tablespoons milk
  2. 1 tablespoon Ener-G egg replacer (use corn starch or flour if you don’t have this)
  3. 2 oz neufchâtel cheese
  4. 1/4 teaspoon vanilla
  5. Dash of cinammon
  6. Dash of salt
  7. 2 tablespoons butter
  8. 4 tablespoons brown sugar
  9. 1/8 teaspoon salt
  10. 1/4 teaspoon cinammon
  11. 1 tablespoon spiced rum
  12. 1 banana, sliced
  13. 1/4 cup chopped pecans
  14. 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  15. 1 tablespoon heavy cream
  16. 6 thick slices of hummingbird bread (any other dessert bread is fine)
  17. Additional butter for frying
  18. Powder sugar for garnish, optional
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl whisk together the milk, egg replacer, cheese, vanilla, dash of salt and dash of cinnamon. Brush both sides of each slice of bread with a fairly thick layer of the batter. Set aside.
  2. Melt butter in a nonstick skillet over medium heat. When it starts to bubble add sugar, salt, cinnamon and rum. Whisk until sugar is dissolved. Add in banana slices and pecans. Let simmer lightly for a few minutes until the bananas begin to soften. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla and heavy cream. Transfer to a dish, cover, and keep warm while you prepare the toast.
  3. Wipe out the nonstick skillet and melt a small amount of butter in it on medium heat. Cook the bread on each side for 4-6 minutes or until lightly browned. Flip and continue cooking on the opposite side until browned. Serve with a spoonful of the banana topping and a sprinkling of powdered sugar if desired.
Calories
  1. 334
Notes
  1. The caloric information on this dish will vary depending on the type of bread you use. In my case the hummingbird bread is under 200 calories per slice. The batter and topping account for 140 calories.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/


Tomato, Mozzarella & Crouton Salad

   

My favorite salad in the history of EVER. We had friends over one night and I had to make this salad because it is one of my go-to recipes for dinner party type situations. I’m not really classy enough for a dinner party but I can do a dinner party type situation alright. This salad is amazing because it’s so easy to make with just a few ingredients, and it’s simple to double or triple depending on how many people you are serving. Or how much the people you are serving love tomatoes, because if you love tomatoes you’ll want to eat a ton of this.

 

Tomato, Mozzarella & Crouton Salad
Serves 6
This salad is a must try for any tomato lover!
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
12 min
Total Time
22 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
12 min
Total Time
22 min
Ingredients
  1. 3 Pints Cherry Tomatoes, halved
  2. 2 7oz Packages Bocconcini, cut into bite sized pieces
  3. ½ Cup Fresh Basil Leaves, chopped
  4. ¼ Cup + 2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  5. 1 Clove Garlic, cut in half
  6. 7-8 Large Slices of Good Bread (I love Parmesan bread for this)
  7. Salt & Pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400F.
  2. Toss the cherry tomatoes, bocconcini, basil, and ¼ cup olive oil in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper according to your own tastes and toss to coat.
  3. Brush each slice of bread with remaining olive oil, rub with cut end of the garlic clove, and sprinkle with salt. Bake 10-12 minutes, until crispy.
  4. Cut toast into 1×1 inch pieces and toss with the salad just before serving.
Calories
  1. 499
Notes
  1. For a more attractive presentation and complex flavor, use different varieties (and colors) of small tomatoes.
Gouda Monster http://www.goudamonster.com/